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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
in relation to syria. other let's look at the guests and topics making up the rest of the sunday programs. >> good morning. on today's network tv talk shows, the topics include the so-called fiscal cliff and the negotiations between the white house and congress and the situation in the middle east. you could hear all the shows on cspan radio beginning at noon eastern. first is meet the press with senator dick durbin and kevin mccarthy. at 1:00 p.m., pierre abc's of this week with republican senator tom coburn and democratic senator debbie stabenow. the chair like to the house financial services committee, jeb hensarling and congressional progress of caucus co-chair. at 2:00 p.m. is fox news sunday with chris wallace and chuck schumer. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cor
undergoing difficult transitions. another example is syria. buckeye that and iraq six to establish there are working to hijack to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated as an alias of aqi, already listed as a foreign terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimacy of the -- to add to this list of challenges and to west africa, the factions continue to carry out attacks in nigeria and win recruits and public sympathy. the number and sophistication of the attacks has increased while the group focuses principally on local ledger in issues, there are reports it is developing financial links other extremists. i need to make something of a detour. while no state actors like al qaeda remain at the top of the list, we have seen a resurgence of state sponsorship terrorism, especially in activities of the iranian regime. with the iranian revolutionary guard corps. in addition to the critical support hezbollah as providing for the assad regime, over the past year, there has been iranian-backed terrorism. hezbollah activity has reached levels unseen si
for a similar instance to happen if and when assad falls in syria? >> it depends on whether we assist or not. the syrian people are not only fighting against assad, but are angry against the united states. people talk about how the syrian people do not understand why we'll will not help them, and they are anchored and embittered. that will dictate a lot of their attitude and our involvement with syria after assad goes. that will be dictated what happens in syria whether they believe we have been of assistance to them or not pick in libya, but they believe we assisted them or showed that appreciation. meanwhile, we took a hike with a light footprint and let all these things develop. i think it depends if we ever have the moral courage, which we are clearly lacking, and assisting the syrian people throw off the yoke of this brutal dictator. we hear again there are now cluster bombs being used. scud missiles. i ask the question that i asked secretary panetta well over a year ago, when about 7000 had been killed -- how many have to die before we're willing to intervene? how many have to die befo
that passes off -- pisses off syria, secretary panetta said later. he said if he invited kim jong he servedinner, jh him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then'pressing s director of the office of management and budget -- then president clinton' director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forwa
of russian policy toward syria? since we mentioned iran, can we get as far away as syria? >> you can get as far away as syria hopefully with some connection to the i.n.f. the question of syria is of totally sufficient importance that we could address that. thank you for the question. my own gut feeling -- i don't know what you guys think -- the russians have been for the last several weeks, there have been indications of unhappiness with what is going on in syria without a clear sense of what it is that they can contribute and whether they could do it on their own or with the u.s. the u.s. has always wanted the russians to be part of that kind of a solution if there be one at all. so, if the russians in any way are moving toward the american position with respect to sir why, i think we are better off for it. if anyone with like to answer that, please do. no? ok, another question out here? >> there is one right up here. then we'll assume that is the last question. >> i wonder if you all hinted or alluded to it, i wonder if you recall the public diplomacy dimension of the movement toward i
on the situation in syria. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 63, i believe and they are going to say that is president. and indiana -- >> we are talking about facts. when they decided the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish it. they did not say all the states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish peeping >> you are misrepresenting. >> no, i am not. >> i hear these accusations that black people, a voter i.d. lost disproportionately affect minorities. it implies to me that we have something missing in our brains. to me, if white americans can get it to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not able to? they are lesser the man? that is what bothers me about the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. there has to be a specialness when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they can follow the rules like everybody else. when you tre
on the situation in syria. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. on c-span. >> by a majority of 6 to 3 and they are going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. they did not say that all of those states who have subsequently done that -- >> let me finish because you misrepresent what i said. >> hold on. >> that's the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities, it implies to me we have something missing in our brain. to me if white can get i.d.'s to vote and follow the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that they are not good enough, that they are lesser than and that bothers me from democrats on the left that we always have to make special -- there has to be a specialness when we deal with minorities because they are too feebleminded. we need to make concessions for them because they can't follow the rules like everybody else. and when you treat people like victims, then i don't think th
the "times" has in places like iran or iraq or syria, pakistan, afghanistan -- they have imbedded people who speak the tribal languages. they have safe houses. they have translators. they have armored cars in some cases, bodyguards. even when they send people into a place like syria, their own medical personnel. did they are really the only paper that does for news at that level. the "washington post" has often had a very polite idea that all they have to do for foreign news is interview the ambassadors in washington and go to the un . they will do the washington news -- the beltway. but they do not do for news. they are probably historical the second best paper in this country. the "times" has an enormous investment in foreign news. if they survive, ultimately, the people who use their foreign news will have to pay for it. i did see -- i want to say something, cnn had some people in syria. that was the most impressive for news i have seen outside of "the new york times" in a very long time. they had somebody who was in syria, and that was impressive. it is still not what we're talking about
aggressive or the stance of an aggressive china. kerry has to look at the civil war in syria and figure out how to contain the damage. if the military loses control over chemical weapons, there could be greater refugee problems and could destabilize jordan and lebanon and to spillover potentially into israel. that will be the first thing. that is much more of a job for a diplomat to ease tensions and to get people to not respond to provocations that the defense secretary. host: first question is gil rahm westchester, new york. caller: i like to know your opinion on mr. kerry's nomination for secretary of state after he called our soldiers killers and murderers and rapists. guest:well, he has been a politician for a very long time and i think over the years he has said and some thisome thing. i am sure in 2004 he regretted some of his affiliations. kerry was never as radical as some of the other members, but he has been in the public eye for more than 40 years and has a very long track record. recently, he was someone known in washington for giving third, fourth, 6, and seven chances to bash
. that is not for news. -- foreign news. "the times" is in places like iraq, syria, pakistan, afghanistan. they have embedded people that have knowledge of languages, they have saved houses, translators, armored cars in some cases, bodyguards, and even when they send people into a place like syria, their own medical personnel. they are really the only paper that does for news at that level, or close. "the washington post" has often had this polite idea that all they have to do for for news is it to the ambassadors in washington or go to the u.n. they are going to do the washington news, right? the beltway. but they do not do for news, and they are historic we probably the second best paper in the country. one of the ways, if they survive, ultimately, the people who steal their foreign news will have to pay for it. none of the major networks are doing foreign news at this level. although, i did want to say something to be fair. last night, cnn had people in syria. that was the most impressive thing that i have seen outside of "the new york times" in a very long time. they had somebody in the north of
a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a pla
, democratic future for syria. these are in line with what we and our international partners would result from the formation of the commission last month. as we look at ongoing efforts to support the syrian people, let me be clear 24e678 united states stands with the syrian people in insist that can any transition process result in a peaceful, unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are protected and a future of this kind cannot inlewd al-assad. >> [inaudible] >> that's correct. we provide significant assistance to the syrian people, we proside significant, not lethal, assistance to the opposition. but our position on providing lethal aid has not changed. >> to foe low up -- >> i've got folks in the back. >> defense secretary suggested the syrian government has preparations of chemical weapons and the administration is not as concerned about this as they were last week, is that accurate? and what has changed? >> i'm not going to get into assessments beyond what secretary of defense pa net -- panetta said. i would simply reiterate our clear warning to the assaad regime about the potenti
syria's deputy foreign minister also visited the regimes of venezuela, cuba, knick rag washington and ecuador -- nicaragua and ecuador. assad, a close ally of the iranian regime, and an enabler for their hezbollah branch, may be seeking political asylum in one of these countries as the situation in syria continues to rapidly deteriorate. mr. speaker, we cannot allow these violent actors a safe haven to conduct their evil schemes and the presence of these individuals only reaffirms the significant threat posed by iran and its proxies to the united states and to the hemisphere. h.r. 3783 requires that the secretary of state outline a u.s. governmentwide strategy to combat the aggressive actions of iran and its proxies such as hezbollah in the western hemisphere toward a comprehensive policy stance that protects the security interests of the united states. we must do everything we can to isolate iran and its proxies from sources of financial assistance in the hemisphere as well as prevent entities from possibly helping iran to evade sanctions. we must ensure that the u.s. is actively
with humanitarian aid, and working for a transition to a syria that is free of the regime. today, i want to make it absolutely clear to assad the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is an would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. [applause] we simply cannot allow the 26 -- the 21st century to the darkened by the weapons of the 20th century. over the last four years, we make critical investments in our production programs. energy, state, and we have been increasing funding and sustaining it. even as we make some very tough fiscal choices, we will keep investing in these programs. our national security depends on it. after all, even with all of your success, the thousands of missiles destroyed, bombers and submarines eliminated, the warheads deactivated, we are nowhere near done. by a long shot. you all know this. there is still much too much material. being stored without enough protection. there are still terrorists and criminal gangs doing everything they can to get their hands on
is the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan and bahrain and syria. the agenda has remained narrow as a means of focusing the issue of our principal concern, namely proliferation. the second school of thought suggests the agenda is broader and perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the debt -- disagreements of the nuclear issue. as far as i can tell, that has never been resolved. when an issue remains not result, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of the bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about the year of this or the year of that. we always think of it as not having enough time. yet there is always more this issue seems a degree of time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before. i suspect there is a bilateral conversation that it will attend the discussion. said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i would be interested to hear what yo
the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan or by iran or syria. they say the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue on our principal concern which is proliferation. the second school of thought suggests if the agenda is broader, perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the agreements on the nuclear issue. that particular concept has never been resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered as a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we talk about years of decision. i think we have more time on this issue. we always think of the issue as not having enough time and being urgent but somehow there is always more time. in 2008, this issue was important and it had an urgency but it has time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before also in 2009. if there is a bilateral discussion [inaudible] >> marina, ray said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty a
want to start off with 9/11, syria, china and the 20 children. three examples, 9/11, syria, people assassinated. i need to understand why you diminished someone's comments with regard to the second amendment and the purpose of that. you have a master's degree. i don't understand. that said rather than being critical. the reality is horrible situation that happened. i don't defend anything that happened at the school, but that said, the individual going into a school with a shotgun, that said we could come back to the 1994 democratic vote. senator feinstein introduced the bill and you guys lost although h lost. i'll stop right there. those are three examples and i invite the listeners to look at the china situation in less than a week ago where ears, arms and fingers were cut off. what say you. guest: we do live in a society where we do feel protected and represented in government. i think that is something that maybe has diminished in the sense of the governments there. we do have a representative democracy and something we should be very, very proud of. and compare us to countries
real problems in the middle east if you look at syria, where the u.s. is at r.f.k. for being drawn into a serious conflict there with weapons? there's obviously real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this and take a look at it. did not say that we would shift everything we have in the military or in across our government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it also talked about an enduring reerment for us to be present and in a security role in the middle east as well. worry talking about a near-term perspective on this. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require -- obviously u.s. leadership, but also will require a certain level of military security over time. and we will have to balance that, as we look at the size and nature of our structure, and once we have the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. i'm convinced we're on a good slope in the
controlling guns one thing or another i take people in syria, iran, and some of these other countries that try to get up against the government and a because the guns are outlawed so they're just helpless and that's what's going to happen to this country i'm afraid. host: dave do you expect to see a -- the discussion on gun control is going to be ramped up but will there be anything different done after this shooting that wasn't done after the columbine shooting do you think? guest: i'm hopeful. i think it's one of these situations where columbine really got the ball rolling. but it wasn't nearly enough. i mean, the mountain was way too high. but we've had year after year of a series of these tragedies where we never dealt again because i think that was a defeatist attitude like if we couldn't do it after columbine people felt we never will. but this situation last week was so awful and coming on the heels of so many others i think we have sort of it feels like we've reached a breaking point where people have said ok this time we're really going to do it. and sometimes it sort of takes in soci
in syria, possibly even today in that devastating area. certainly perfect partner at the united nations for four years in diligent, excellent, astute, thoughtful, and patriotic service has been susan e. rice, a daughter of washington, d.c., and parents who loved america. a graduate of stanford university where, of course, she earned department honors and university distinction. became a harry s. truman scholar, phi beta kappa, and rhodes scholarship. certainly a beginning that did not warrant the kind of personal attacks that we have seen. i think we should leave politics and campaigns and won or lost races to november 6, 2012. for you cannot debate a political and presidential campaign around a patriotic public servant. if there is a nomination for ambassador rice, the senate has every right to advise and consent and the votes need to be taken on up and down. i can assure you that if she is nominated by the president, she will serve this nation well. as she has done in the past. i know her well as the assistant secretary for african affairs under the clinton administration. dealing wit
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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